Blog Archives

Word To The Wise – FIber can be deadly

I’ve been doing well on my low calorie, low fat, high fiber diet.  Especially the high fiber part.  If you look at the lable on most 100 calorie snacks, low calorie bread, these really delicious Fiber One bars that I eat 2 of every day, and just about everything Jenny Craig has to offer, you’ll see the fiber counts are off the radar.  The ‘recommended daily allowance of fiber’ for a woman in her 20’s – 30’s is 24g a day.  Most days I have 30g or more – those dang FIber One bars are 35% of my recommended daily fiber and my favorite Jenny C cereals range from 30 – 50% of my recommended intake.  By the time I add a salad, side of veggies, fruit and anything else for the day, I’m off the chart.

One would think this would be great for the fat girl – eat, crap, less fat…Not so much.  Too much fiber can cause bloating, gas and dry, compact stool.  Sounds like TMI, but I’m really trying to warn ya’ll.  Fiber is an amazing nutrient – but it has to be used correctly.  When you add fiber to your diet – don’t forget to add more water!  I woke up at 6 this morning with “the jimmy-leg” and a serious set of stomach cramps.  (Don’t pretend you don’t know about the jimmy-leg: when you have to crap so badly that your leg starts shaking like you just ran a 20-mile race.) – Well that’s how I started my day.  One problem – I didn’t drink enough yesterday so there was a dustbowl brewing in my booty.  It didn’t feel good at all 😦 But the upside is that when I finally “went,” I probably “purged” all of my unused food from the day before.  A very nice, weight-reducing effect of fiber.

The moral of the story is: use fiber and the right mix of water and you can crap your way to faster weight loss.  Just know what you’re doing.

Here are a few Fiber Facts from the Mayo Clinic:

Benefits of a high-fiber diet

A high-fiber diet has many benefits, which include:

  • Prevents constipation. Dietary fiber increases the weight and size of your stool and softens it. A bulky stool is easier to pass, decreasing your chance of constipation. If you have loose, watery stools, fiber may also help to solidify the stool because it absorbs water and adds bulk to stool.
  • Lowers your risk of digestive conditions. A high-fiber diet may lower your risk of specific disorders, such as hemorrhoids, irritable bowel syndrome and the development of small pouches in your colon (diverticular disease).
  • Lowers blood cholesterol levels. Soluble fiber found in beans, oats, flaxseed and oat bran may help lower total blood cholesterol levels by lowering low-density lipoprotein, or “bad,” cholesterol levels.
  • Controls blood sugar levels. Fiber, particularly soluble fiber, can slow the absorption of sugar, which for people with diabetes, can help improve blood sugar levels. A high-fiber diet may also reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
  • Aids in weight loss. High-fiber foods generally require more chewing time, which gives your body time to register when you’re no longer hungry, so you’re less likely to overeat. Also, a high-fiber diet tends to make a meal feel larger and linger longer, so you stay full for a greater amount of time. And high-fiber diets also tend to be less “energy dense,” which means they have fewer calories for the same volume of food.